Lots of Fruit Bats

I came across a bat colony yesterday on the way back from school.

I'm not sure what variety these are, fruit bats not being something I've looked into, but this is just a very small amount of the large colony on Days Rd, Wight''s Mountain.

View all photos taken: Thursday, 23rd October 2008, This photo: 9:11am

Previous Photo: Long-Billed Corella

Comments

  • The Central Scrutiniser said:
    they are grey-headed fruit bats... no doubt bristling with lyssa-virus.
  • David de Groot said:
    There were also some fully black ones there too - seemed to be two different varieties, but then my knowledge of bats isn't fantastic.
    Luckily for me, they were afraid of the cameraman and flew off if I got too close ;-)
  • The Central Scrutiniser said:
    black fruit bats, another species, are often found among grey-headed colonies. the colonies seem to live in close association. could be what yu saw. there is really no danger unless yu start handling them.
  • David de Groot said:
    Fair enough, I wasn't intending to handle them and frankly I was more worried about the possibility of a nasty snake hiding in the waste high grass I had to wade through.
  • Im_a_teapot said:
    The Central Scrutiniser Pro User says:
    they are grey-headed fruit bats... no doubt bristling with lyssa-virus.
    Posted 8 hours ago. ( permalink )
    ____________________________
    Shirley your are joking? Infection rates in wild bats vary from 1 - 7% from my understanding. That is hardly bristling. Studies which show higher rates are from skewed pools, where the animals have been submitted for testing specifically because they are suspected of having Australian Bat Lyssavirus because of they have neuro signs or have bitten someone.
    Grey-headed flying-foxes and Black Headed Flying-foxes often share camp in the area where there range overlaps. On the whole you will find the Blacks roost higher and are more dominant. There are also camps on the east coast where you will also sometimes find Little Reds as well.
    Grey-headed flying-foxes are listed as vulnerable as a state and federal level as they are endemic to Australia and their numbers are crashing.
    Pythons tend to eat flying-foxes rather than elapids, even so, it's worth being careful around long grass!

    cheers
    storm
  • David de Groot said:
    Greg's with the DPI, I'm sure he's well aware of the infection rates for bats.
    As for the snakes, I was worried for myself rather than the bats :)
  • Im_a_teapot said:
    Greg's with the DPI, I'm sure he's well aware of the infection rates for bats.
    _______________________________

    Ah, there you go, I find it difficult to tell when people are joking sometimes...
    There is a great picture of a python eating a FF in Wilson and Swan.
    Anyhoo, time to go and feed the ff pup in the animal room.
    cheers
    storm
  • The Central Scrutiniser said:
    i was being flippant with the use of the word "bristling" - but the i have seen figures on incidence of lyssa virus among the different species and some are much higher than 7%.
    ... will take a look when i am back at work.
  • Papichulo[HUN] said:
    Nice catch!
  • David de Groot said:
    Thanks :)
  • Im_a_teapot said:
    i was being flippant with the use of the word "bristling" - but the i have seen figures on incidence of lyssa virus among the different species and some are much higher than 7%.
    ________________________________________
    Ah, sorry. I spent far too much time trying to convince people that neither snakes nor bats are as dangerous as they might believe and if they just leave both ALONE everything will be fine! It's given me a serious blind spot in that area. :-)
    The microbat, Yellow-bellied Sheath-tail, has some amazing infection rate. The first woman who died, the rehabber, turned out her ABL infection came from a YBST.
    Also I just read that in Dave Pinson's bat care manual, Little Red FF have a higher infection rate than GHFF.
    This is recent review for NSW Health of various surveillance and practise papers:
    www.publish.csiro.au/?act=view_file&file_id=NB07050.pdf
    cheers
    storm